Biology

BIO 10104 Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This course examines the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology of the human organism with emphasis on cells, tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, cardiovascular system, and respiratory system. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. This course is for allied heath majors. Course fee required. Prerequisite: C  or better in High School Biology AND Chemistry or C- or better in BIO11404 AND CHM 10404

Offered Fall, Spring for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 10204 Principles of Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This course examines the fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology of the human organism with emphasis on nervous, endocrine, lymphatic, digestive, urinary and  reproductive systems. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. This course is for Allied Health majors. Course fee required. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 10104.

Offered Spring for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 10302 Microbiology for Nurses

This is a survey course to provide the student with an understanding of the basic concepts and methodology of the discipline of microbiology. This course provides a study of microorganisms with emphasis on their relationship to pathogenesis, disease prevention, and principles of immunology. Two lecture hours. This course is designed for nursing student ONLY. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 10104 (Nurses: C or better in BIO 10104).

Offered Spring for 2 Semester hours.

BIO 11004 Plants and People

This course will present interrelationships of plants and humans from both historical and modern points of view. Fundamentals of plant biology (structure, function, genetics, and evolution) are examined. Also presented will be origins of agriculture and civilization, tropical and temperate food plants, medicinal plants, drug plants, destruction of the environment and its ultimate effect on food plants. Lecture 3 hours, Lab 2 hours.

Offered Fall, On Demand, Spring, Summer for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 11404 (TM) Principles of Biology

This course will cover major biological topics about the origin, development, and organization of life. Through lab activities, students will learn to analyze data and use the scientific method to solve problems. Current issues related to biological topics will be discussed as appropriate. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Course fee required.

Offered Fall, Spring, Summer for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 12104 Biology I

Introduces students to the basic concepts of cellular and molecular biology, including but not limited to the studies of the molecules of life, membrane structure and function, cell structure and function, DNA, DNA replication, cellular replication, and basic patterns of inheritance. Students will also be introduced to the process of scientific inquiry, including hypothesis testing and data analysis. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Course fee required. Note: This course can be used in place of Principles of Biology to meet the General Education requirement for life sciences. However, Principles of Biology may not be substituted for Biology I for a major in biology or environmental science.

Offered Fall, Spring for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 12204 Biology

Survey of living organisms, including bacteria, archaea, protists, fungi, plants, and animals, with emphasis on evolution, classification, and the design and function of major biological systems. Students will also be introduced to basic evolutionary and ecological principles. Scientific inquiry including observational skills, experimental design, and data analysis will be emphasized throughout the course. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Course fee required. Prerequisites: C- or better in BIO 12104

Offered Fall, Spring for 2 Semester hours.

BIO 20704 Ecology

Fundamental ecological principles, including factors controlling species distributions, animal behavior, population growth and demography, species interactions, community structure and diversity, and basic ecosystem processes are covered in this course. Students are required to do inquiry-based investigations and analysis of data. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Course fee required. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 12204.

Offered Fall for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 21404 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This course examines the concepts of anatomy and physiology as they are found in the human organism. Presentations are on the basis of structure, function, and interaction in the areas of cell metabolism, tissues, skin, bone, joints, muscles, central, peripheral and autonomic nervous systems and endocrinology. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Course fee required. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 12204.

BIO 22404 Human Anatomy and Physiology 2

This course examines the concepts of anatomy and physiology as they are found in the human organism. Presentations are on the basis of structure, function, and interaction in the areas of cardiology, blood, respiration, lymphatics, digestion, nutrition, renal, water balance, reproduction and development. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Course fee required. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 21404.

Offered Spring for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 24203 Wildlife Natural History and Identification

This course focuses on the natural history, distribution, and identification of vertebrates. The emphasis is on North American species with aging and sexing techniques presented for selected species. Two-hour lecture and two-hour lab. Prerequisites: BIO 12204.

Offered Spring for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 25203 Wildlife Management: Principles and Practices

This course is an introduction to the principles and practices of managing wildlife. The key aspects examined are the historic use of wildlife in North America, the origins of wildlife management as a discipline, and the basics of wildlife-habitat relationships and management, population dynamics, human-wildlife conflicts, species (both single and multiple) management including consumptive and non-consumptive uses, and key legislation impacting conservation. Two-hour lecture and two-hour lab. Prerequisites: BIO 12204.

BIO 26901 Wildlife Practicum

This course requires field or lab “hands-on” data collection and/or analysis or participation in monitoring local flora or fauna or habitat manipulation. Activities may include participating in eco-monitoring projects at designated URG sites or with a local, state, or national conservation-oriented agency or non-governmental organization. Student must maintain a log of activities and complete an exit survey to be conducted by the assigned faculty supervising the practicum. Requires forty (40) hours of field and/or lab effort. Student may repeat this course up to 3 times (for a maximum of 4 credit hours for Wildlife Practicum). Prerequisites: BIO 12104 or permission of instructor and School Chair.

Offered On Demand for 1 Semester hours.

BIO 28801-03 Selected Topics in Biology

This course is designed to be taught on demand. It could include research or a seminar approach to topics of biological significance. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, and permission of instructor and School Chair. Course fee required.

Offered On Demand for 1-3 Semester hours.

BIO 29901-03 Directed Studies in Biology

This course requires a student to conduct a focused literature review and/or research project addressing a Biology, Environmental Science or Wildlife Conservation topic. A formal, written summary of work—usually in the form of a peer-reviewed manuscript format, a poster, or formal oral presentation will be required. Prerequisites: BIO 12204 (and permission of instructor and School Chair.

Offered On Demand for 1-3 Semester hours.

BIO 30304 Microbiology

This course is a study of the structure, physiology, classification, and interactions of microorganisms with emphasis on microbes of importance to medicine, industry, and biotechnology. It also includes mechanisms of pathogenicity, body defense mechanisms, and immunology. Three-lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 12204.

Offered Spring for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 31303 Advanced Ornithology

This course is a study of the classification, evolution, distribution, life histories, and morphological, ecological, and behavioral adaptations of birds. Two-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 20704 or Hocking College Associate Degree in Wildlife Sciences.

Offered Spring for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 31404 Vertebrate Zoology

The classification, identification, comparative anatomy, and natural history of the vertebrates are considered in this course. Dissection is utilized to study the organ systems of representatives of the classes. Emphasis is given to the identification and natural history of the species common to our region. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 20704.

Offered On Demand for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 32303 Mammalogy

This course is a study of mammals with an emphasis on diversity, distribution, life history, ecology, and field techniques. Two-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 20704 and or HC WM 156.

Offered Spring for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 33404 Invertebrate Zoology

This course is a survey of the major groups of invertebrates with emphasis on taxonomy, structure, reproduction, and evolution. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 20703.

Offered On Demand for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 34403 Introduction to Biochemistry

This is an introductory course that covers the structure, function, and reactions of biological macromolecules, including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Three-hour lecture. Prerequisites: CHM 27303 and BIO 12104.

Offered Fall for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 35304 Field Biology and Methodology

This course focuses on the various types of terrestrial and ecosystems common to the region with an emphasis on biotic and abiotic components and their relationships Labs focus on the use of specimen collection techniques, use of taxonomic keys, use of soil and water analysis equipment, and other ecological field methods. Students are required to do inquiry-based investigations and analysis of data. Three-hour lecture, three-hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 20704 or Hocking College Associate Degree in Wildlife or Fish Sciences.

Offered Fall for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 35403 Field Botany

This course covers field identification of local plants. Topics covered include basic classification, naming, taxonomic keys, life histories, and basic growth patterns. Emphasis is on the recognition of woody species of the region. Prerequisites: C- or better in BIO 20704. Cannot take if have taken BIO 36303. Two-hour lecture, two-hour lab.

Offered On Demand for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 36303 Local Flora

This course covers classification, morphology, distribution, and identification of the woody and herbaceous plants. Emphasis is on the recognition of the plants and plant communities of the region. Two-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 20704 or Hocking College Associate Degree in Wildlife or Fish Sciences.

Offered Fall for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 36404 Genetics

Variation and heredity in living organisms are considered at the whole organism, molecular, and population levels. This course includes an examination of the historical development of genetics from Mendel to modern research on DNA. This course also examines current biotechnology and some of its implications to society. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisites: C- or better in BIO 20704 and CHM 15005.

Offered Fall for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 36804 Advanced Plant Biology

This course is an advanced course in plant biology that will thoroughly cover the general principles of plant biology, including structure, function, diversity, reproduction, and evolution of plants. Emphasis will be placed on plant systematics, plant physiology, plant development and anatomy, ecology, and evolution. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 20704.

Offered On Demand for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 37103 Principles of Conservation Genetics

This course is a broad survey of genetic principles and techniques as they apply to the management and conservation of wildlife populations. Beginning with an overview of foundational genetic concepts, the course will progress through contemporary techniques of measuring and characterizing genetic diversity to basic modeling of population genetics. Special emphasis will be placed on the genetics and evolution of small and fragmented wildlife populations. Some lab activities will be incorporated to complement and reinforce concepts and materials covered in lecture. Three-hour lecture. Prerequisites: C- or better in HC BIO 12104 and BIO 12204 or equivalent or Hocking College Associate Degree in Wildlife or Fish Sciences.

Offered Spring for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 37303 Cellular and Molecular Biology

This course will provide an overview of cell biology, emphasizing the molecular and genetic basis of cell structure and function and the dynamic nature of cells and their components. The course is intended for majors in biological sciences and will build on concepts introduced in the prerequisite classes. Students will use knowledge of molecules and genetics to explore topics in protein function, cell compartmentalization, signaling, and dynamics. Three-hour lecture. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 36404 and CHM 15505.

Offered On Demand for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 37504 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

A study of the similarities of anatomy and phylogenetic relationships of major vertebrate groups. Emphasis is on comparative anatomical structural, functional, and evolutionary relationships within and between major taxa or vertebrates. Laboratories include dissection and study of representative chordate systems with emphasis on the anatomy and evolution of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 20704.

Offered On Demand for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 38402 Immunology

This course is a study of basic immunologic mechanisms, immunologic techniques (principles and application of methods), and the clinical laboratory correlation of infectious, immune complex, auto immune, immunodeficient, and immunoproliferative diseases, organ and cell transplantation, hypersensitivity states, and tumor immunology. Two-hour lecture. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 20704.

Offered On Demand for 2 Semester hours.

BIO 38503 Environmental Toxicology

This course is designed to provide an overview of environmental toxicology, including an examination of the major classes of pollutants, their fate in the environment, their disposition in organisms, and their mechanisms of toxicity. An emphasis will also be placed on the assessment of the toxicity of pollutants in biological and environmental systems and of contemporary problems on human health associated with environmental toxicants. Three-hour lecture. Prerequisites: C- or better in BIO 20704 and CHM 15505.

Offered On Demand for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 40303 Evolution

Evolution is the one unifying theory of modern biology. This course is designed to introduce the history of life on earth and the history of evolutionary theory, the mechanisms that influence change, and the evidences of these mechanisms. The course is meant to be a seminar/discussion course. Three-hour lecture. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 36404.

Offered On Demand for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 41304 Limnology

A comprehensive study of inland waters. The course focuses on the physical, chemical, biological and morphological characteristics of lakes, streams, rivers, estuaries, and wetlands. Emphasis is place on theory and concepts of limnology in lectures and practice the techniques of water sampling and data collection and analysis in laboratory field studies. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 20704 or Hocking College Associate Degree in Wildlife or Fish Sciences.

Offered Fall for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 42303 Human-Wildlife Conflicts

Theory and practice of assessing and controlling damage done by wild and feral vertebrate animals, especially mammals and birds. Content covers the philosophical, biological, and practical basis for conducting vertebrate pest control. It includes basic information on use of traps, toxicants, repellents, exclusion and other wildlife control methods. Emphasis is on protecting agricultural crops and livestock, forest resources, and property. Two-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisites: C- or better in BIO 20704 or Hocking College Associate Degree in Wildlife or Fish Sciences.

Offered Fall for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 43103 Applied Population Biology

This course is a study of basic population processes using conceptual and quantitative approaches. The focus will be on ecological attributes and interactions that govern the structure and growth dynamics of populations across times and space. Fundamental aspects of mathematical modeling and ecological forecasting of populations will be examined with detailed discussion of the relevance to wildlife conservation and management problems. Special emphasis will be placed on species with small, declining, and/ or harvestable populations. Two-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisite MTH 21404 or HC WLM 2251 or similar course or Hocking College Associate Degree in Wildlife or Fish Sciences.

Offered Spring for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 43404 Parasitology

This course is a study of the parasites which infect man. Analyses of the morphology life cycles, staining characteristics, geographical habitats, and immunological characteristics will be carried out. Specimen source, collection, storage, transportation, and processing will be discussed. Relationship of parasitic findings to disease stages will be considered. Three-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisite: C- or better in BIO 20704 and BIO 21304. Fall alternate years.

Offered On Demand for 4 Semester hours.

BIO 44403 Advanced Biochemistry

This is an advanced course that covers the metabolic pathways involving biological macromolecules, including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Three-hour lecture. Prerequisites: CHM/BIO 34403.

Offered Spring for 3 Semester hours.

 

BIO 45303 Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology is the scientific study of the phenomena that affect the maintenance, loss, and restoration of biological diversity. Topics covered include: 1) the role of ecology, biogeography, and genetics in maintaining species and ecosystem diversity, 2) the effects of human activities on the loss of natural habitats and biodiversity with consideration of strategies developed to combat these threats, 3) key economic and ethical tradeoffs required to sustain biodiversity, 4) key legislation and policies affecting conservation, 5) the role of nongovernmental organizations in conservation, and 6) the design and roles of nature preserves, zoos, and botanical gardens. Two-hour lecture, two-hour lab. Prerequisites: C- or better in BIO 20704 or Hocking College Associate Degree in Wildlife or Fish Sciences.

BIO 47003 Senior Research

Students will either 1) perform an inquiry-based research project that involves lab or field data collection, statistical analysis, interpretation of results and presentation of findings in oral and/or written format or 2) perform an extensive literature research project and producing a paper that includes an overview of the topic and major findings. Prerequisites: Senior standing with a major/minor in Biology, Chemistry, or Environmental Science.

Offered On Demand for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 47103 GIS Applications for Resource Management

This course is a study of how Geographical Information Systems (GIS) are used in the management and conservation of natural resources. Beginning with an overview of GIS software and basic functions, the course will then address fundamental applications of GIS, including habitat mapping, watershed analysis, species distribution modeling, disease risk mapping, and conservation area planning. The lab component will consist of conducting mini-projects using ArcGIS in each of the fundamental applications listed. Two hours lecture, two hours lab. Prerequisites: None.

Offered Fall for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 48801-03 Selected Topics in Biology

This course is a study of topics not included in other course offerings. The format may be independent or directed studies, a research project, a scheduled class, or a seminar. Open to Biology majors or students in Wildlife Conservation. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and School Chair.

Offered On Demand for 1-3 Semester hours.

BIO 49303 Pathophysiology for Healthcare Professionals

This course examines the concepts of pathophysiology as they relate to health care. Students will explore common pathologies they would encounter in real world settings as health care professionals. Case studies will help show them how to use what they learn to deal with every day issues found in health care. Three-hour lecture. Prerequisite: C – or better in BIO 22404 or BIO 10204 or by permission of the instructor.

Offered Fall for 3 Semester hours.

BIO 49901-03 Directed Studies in Biology

This course is a study of a selected topic in Biology or Wildlife Conservation resulting in the writing of a research paper or similar project. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and School Chair.

Offered On Demand for 1-3 Semester hours.