AcceptableUse Policy

Acceptable & Ethical Use of Technology Resources Policy
 
University of Rio Grande
Rio Grande Community College

Acceptable & Ethical Use of Technology Resources Policy
- Board Approved (summer 97) -

Statement of Intent

It is the express intent of the University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community college to promote the responsible use of computing resources in support of the primary educational and academic missions of these entities. It is furthermore the express intent of the University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College to adhere to the provisions of state and federal laws concerning use of computers, installation and/or use of software, copyrights, and information access, and to promote responsible academic activities within these boundaries.

Campus Technology resources at the University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College (URGRGCC) are essential and indispensable tools for learning, research and administration. It is the policy of the University that its computing, telecommunications, video, and associated network facilities be used ethically and legally, in accord with applicable licenses and contracts, and according to their intended use in support of the University's mission.

Any use that would impede teaching and research, hinder the functioning of the University, violate an applicable license or contract, violate a state or federal law, or damage community relations or relations with institutions with whom we share responsibility, is a violation of this policy.

Violation of this policy may result in suspension of privileges to access the information technology involved, initiation of University disciplinary procedures or, in extreme cases, criminal prosecution under federal or state law.

Please refer any questions about this policy or its applicability to a particular situation to the Vice President Technology and Long Range Planning.

To these ends the following ethical guidelines have been developed.

Ethical Use of Campus Technology Resources

Campus computing, networking, media and technology resources are provided for the use of University students, faculty, and staff in support of the programs of the University. Most people use these resources in an ethical and responsible manner. However, as with many shared resources, it is possible that misuse, either accidental or willful, can seriously disrupt the work of others. The guidelines below are provided to increase your awareness of the issues involved.

Definitions

Campus Technology Resources

(CTR) include, but are not limited to, terminals, computers, computer peripherals, communication devices, telephones and telecommunications equipment, fax machines, computer data networks, video equipment and video networks, photocopying machines, computer software, supporting documentation, supplies, storage media, support facilities and energy sources. Computer systems are limited to those leased, rented, owned by, or loaned to the University.

Campus Technology Services

(CTS) consist of Management Information Systems (administrative computing), Campus Computing and Network Services, Instructional Media Center, and telecommunications services. An example of these "other services" is an external network infrastructure such as the Internet or an audio visual instructional network connecting partnering institutions.

Electronic Information (Information)

(EI) includes all material stored in or moved by electronic information technology systems including, but not limited to data, records, files, data bases, electronic mail, text, digital images, video images, digital sounds, voice mail, discussion group postings, electronic bulletin board discussions, software, programs, codes and electronic procedures.

User Authentication Codes

(UAC) are any form of information used to authenticate, secure or control electronic information technology systems. This includes, but is not limited to, logon ID's, passwords, keys, and account numbers.

Campus Technology Services Administrator

(CTSA) is the person responsible for the administration and use policy for a particular portion of Campus Technology Resources. The Campus Technology Resource environment is a collection of separately administered and often interconnected Campus Technology Resources. For example, one portion might be a departmental local area network, including local servers, printers, etc. connected to a University backbone network. A portion might also be shared central computers, the telecommunications network or the campus-wide video network. The campus-wide data network provides dial-in access and access to external national and international data networks.

The CTSA will often delegate specific responsibilities to designated individuals. A portion might be a departmental local area network, including local servers, printers, etc. connected to a University backbone network. In this case the delegated individual responsible might be the department or division head or school chairperson.

The CTSA for the campus-wide data network, the telecommunications network, the campus- wide video network and MIS computing is the Vice-Provost for Technology and Long-Range Planning.

Departmental Technology Coordinator

(DTC) Departments or Schools may appoint a coordinator of technology services for the purpose of autonomy and/or responsiveness to local needs. By necessity, this individual needs to be in close communications with the CTSA and the persons responsible for Campus Technology Services and have expertise with the technologies involved. The DTC may employ the assistance of Lab Coordinators and/or other student labor resources to extend the management and supervision of localized technology services.
 

Technology Services - Organizational Structure

Campus Technology Services Administrator (CTSA)
  
Management Information Systems(MIS)
MIS Staff
Student Labor

Campus Computing and Networking Services(CCNS)
CCNS Staff
Student Labor

Instructional Media Center(IMC)
Media Center Staff
Student Labor

Campus Telecommunications(CT)
Out-Sourced to a Vendor or Campus Staff

Departmental Technology Coordinator(DTC)
Department Head School Chair Delegated Person(s)

1. Campus Technology Resource (CTR) Ethics

Access to Campus Technology Resources is a privilege that is granted by the University and comes with a responsibility to respect the rights of other users and the rights of the University. To do otherwise is unethical. Issues concerning ownership and privacy of Information are addressed in the attached University Conditions of Use of Campus Technology Resources statement. If you will not abide by the University Conditions of Use of Campus Technology Resources, it is unethical to use any portion of the University CTR.

2. User Authentication Code Usage

A. Access to Campus Technology Resources is a privilege that has an accompanying responsibility to protect those systems. In general, you are responsible for all usage done under your Authentication Codes. Should you choose to disclose your User Authentication Code(s) to others, you will be held responsible for the resulting usage. In particular, you should never disclose User Authentication which were intended to provide you alone with personal access to University Campus Technology Resources. You should avoid disclosing your CTR Access Codes, even when requested to by someone who says it is necessary to work on a problem.

Disclosure of User Authentication may put you and/or the person to whom you have disclosed your User Authentication in violation of an applicable license or contract. You should take all reasonable precautions, including but not limited to frequent password changes and other file protection measures, to prevent unauthorized use of the systems and software accessible by means of your Access Codes.

B. You should only use CTR User authentication that you are authorized to use. You should not try in any way to obtain CTR User authentication codes in an unauthorized or fraudulent manner. This includes, but is not limited to, providing false or misleading information for the purpose of obtaining Access Codes, capturing of User authentication or theft of Access Codes. It is unethical to engage in activity that is intended to produce entry into a CTR by persuading CTR users to reveal their access codes.

C. Although you have a right to access the Information for which you are authorized, you should not attempt to circumvent User Authentication procedures or Information protection schemes or uncover security loopholes or attempt to break authentication procedures or encryption protocols. These activities are sometimes called "hacking" or "cracking." Using loopholes in CTR security systems to access your own data is inappropriate and may be hazardous. Using loopholes in CTR security systems for unauthorized access or activities is unethical and in many cases illegal (for partial example, see 18 USC 1030, 1343, 2071, 2314, 2701-2711; ORC 2913.04). These activities include, but are not limited to, the unauthorized changing of access rights, privileges, ownership, resource allocations, or quotas. You should refrain from experiments that attempt to find or demonstrate CTR vulnerabilities without the prior permission of the appropriate CCTSA. In particular, it is expected that you will not use University Campus Technology Resources to "hack" or "crack" External Campus Technology Resources. It is also expected that you will respect the financial structure of the Campus Technology Resources by not intentionally developing or using any unauthorized mechanisms to alter or avoid charges levied for CTR access or use. If you find that you have unintentionally gained unauthorized access, stop. Take no further action on the system and immediately contact the appropriate CTSA.

3. Anonymous Activity

A. Sending information, especially electronic mail, that does not correctly identify the sender is unethical, and can be illegal (see for partial example, 18 USC 1030, 1343; ORC 4165.02).

B. It is also the responsibility of the CTSA to ensure that Campus Technology Resources do not permit "public" User authentication which permit the anonymous distribution of arbitrary Information. For example, it would be fine to allow access to public domain software or documentation through a public "Guest" Access Code, but would be inappropriate to allow "Guests" to send electronic mail to just anyone. It would also be inappropriate for the CTSA to allow "Guests" to access resources outside the domain of his or her CTR. For example, it would be improper to provide "Guests" with general access to the Internet.

C. CTSAs should refrain from setting up "generic" or "project" computer accounts with the intent to grant the same CTR Access Code to multiple people. Multiple access can obscure anonymous activity. Other technical solutions should be explored for such purposes, such as a distribution list that receives a message and forwards it to several unique IDs.

D. Setting up an CTR to "masquerade" as another CTR for the purpose of anonymous activity is unethical and may be illegal. (For example, see ORC 4165.02).

4. Illegal Activity

In general, it is unethical to store and/or give access to Information on Campus Technology Resources that could result in legal action against the University. You should not use Campus Technology Resources in the course of any illegal activity. Individuals using CTR should be familiar with the Electronic Communications Act (18 USC 2701-2711) and various Ohio statutes governing computing activities, such as ORC 2913.04 and 4165.02. A non-exhaustive list of these and additional statutes which may apply (along with Web addresses) may be found in Appendix A.

Campus Technology System Administrators responsible for CTR Information servers have the responsibility to ensure that their Information servers are operated in an ethical manner. In particular, the CTSA for CTR Information servers should ensure that access to licensed Information on their servers conforms to the terms and conditions of the license. Legal questions should be referred to the appropriate CTSA, the Vice-Provost for Technology and Long-Range Planning, and/or University Counsel.

5. Communication Tampering

A. It is unethical and may be criminal to attempt to monitor other people's communications without their permission. Likewise, you should not view, read, listen to, copy, change, execute or delete another user's Information without that user's or the owner's permission. This includes but is not limited to monitoring, reading, or tampering with electronic-mail of which you are neither the author nor the addressee. In particular, you should not read electronic mail messages without the consent of one of the addressees. Exceptions for legitimate purposes should be obtained from the Vice Provost for Technology and Long-Range Planning. Authorization to possess and use packet/data observation software for legitimate diagnostic purposes may be obtained from the appropriate CTSA.

B. CTSAs may authorize CTR "postmasters" to read electronic mail headers as necessary in order to correct addresses on "dead letters" or to perform other legitimate diagnostic tasks.

6. Restricted Software and Hardware

A. You should not knowingly possess, give to another person, install on any CTR, or run, programs or other Information which could result in the violation of any University policy or the violation of any applicable license, contract, State or Federal Statute. This is directed towards but not limited to software known as viruses, Trojan horses, worms, password breakers, and packet observers. Authorization to possess and use Trojan horses, worms, viruses and password breakers for legitimate research or diagnostic purposes can be obtained from the Vice President for Technology and Long-Range Planning. Authorization to possess and use packet/data observation software for diagnostic purposes may be obtained from the appropriate CTR.

B. The unauthorized physical connection of monitoring devices to the CTR which could result in the violation of University policy or applicable licenses or contracts or state or federal statutes is unethical. This includes but is not limited to the attachment of any electronic device to the CTR for the purpose of monitoring data, packets, signals or other Information. Authorization to possess and use such hardware for legitimate diagnostic purposes must be obtained from the appropriate CTR.

7. Copying and Copyrights

A. Respect for intellectual labor and creativity is essential to academic discourse. This tenet applies to works of all authors and publishers in all media. It includes respect for the right to acknowledgment and right to determine the form, manner, and terms of publication and distribution. If a copyright exists, as in most situations, it includes the right to determine whether the work may be reproduced at all. Because electronic Information is volatile and easily reproduced or altered, respect for the work and personal expression of others is especially critical in CTR environments. Viewing, listening to or using another person's Information without authorization is unethical. Ethical standards apply even when this Information is left unprotected.

(The above paragraph is adapted with permission from "Software Initiative Publishes Statement on Software and Intellectual Rights", EDUCOM Bulletin, Spring 1987)

B. Users of Campus Technology Resources must abide by the University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College (URGRGCC) Copyright Policy, which covers copyright issues pertaining to University faculty, staff and students as well as commissioned works of non-employees.

C. For Information which the individual or the University does not hold the copyright, written permission from the copyright holder is required to duplicate any copyrighted material. This includes duplication of audio tapes, videotapes, photographs, illustrations, computer software and all other Information for educational use or any other purpose. Exceptions to this policy must be obtained in writing from University counsel.

D. In particular, you should be aware of and abide by the University Policy on Copying and Using Computer Software. Most software that resides on Campus Technology Resources is owned by the University or third parties, and is protected by copyright and other laws, together with licenses and other contractual agreements. You are required to respect and abide by the terms and conditions of software use and redistribution licenses. Such restrictions may include prohibitions against copying programs or data for use on Campus Technology Resources or for distribution outside the University; against the resale of data or programs, or the use of them for non-educational purposes or for financial gain; and against public disclosure of information about programs (e.g., source code) without the owner's authorization. University employees who develop new packages that include components subject to use, copying, or redistribution restrictions have the responsibility to make any such restrictions known to the users of those packages.

E. With a greater emphasis on computer based assignments, students need to be especially aware of CTR ethics. In particular, academic dishonesty or plagiarism in a student assignment may be suspected if the assignment calling for independent work results in two or more solutions so similar that one can be converted to another by a mechanical transformation. Academic dishonesty in an assignment may also be suspected if a student who was to complete an assignment independently cannot explain both the intricacies of the solution and the techniques used to generate that solution. Suspected occurrences of academic dishonesty are referred to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College Copyright Policy
Link to Policy's Text

8. Harassment

A. The University has a policy prohibiting sexual and discriminatory harassment. The University Policy Statement on Discriminatory Harassment covers all forms and means of sexual discriminatory harassment, including any such activities using Campus Technology Resources. CTR usage or Information that is perceived by its recipient as sexual or discriminatory harassment as defined by University policy may be considered a violation. In particular, many computer-mediated conferences available via External Campus Technology Resources are open to the general public. Engaging in sexual or discriminatory harassment in this context or in any public conference on a network is an unethical abuse of access privilege.

B. The display of offensive material in any publicly accessible area is likely to violate University harassment policy. There are materials available on the Internet and elsewhere that some members of the University community will find offensive. One example is sexually explicit graphics. The University can not restrict the availability of such material, but it considers its display in a publicly accessible area to be unethical. Public display includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible computer screens and printers.

9. Wasting Resources

A. It is unethical and possibly illegal to deliberately perform any act which will impair the operation of any CTR or deny access by legitimate users to any Electronic System. This includes but is not limited to wasting resources, tampering with components or reducing the operational readiness of a CTR.

B. The willful wasting of CTR resources is unethical and potentially illegal. Wastefulness includes but is not limited to passing chain letters, willful generation of large volumes of unnecessary printed output or disk space, willful creation of unnecessary multiple jobs or processes, or willful creation of heavy network traffic. In particular, the practice of willfully using CTR for the establishment of frivolous and unnecessary chains of communication connections ("spamming") is an unethical waste of resources.

C. Game-playing outside of an educational context is generally permitted insofar as such activities do not adversely impact others or violate other provisions of these Guidelines. "Game-playing" is developing or executing a computer program which primarily provides amusement or diversion. Game-playing may be restricted or banned by the appropriate (usually local) CTSA.

D. The sending of random mailings ("junk mail") is strongly discouraged but generally permitted insofar as such activities do not violate the other guidelines set out in this document. It is poor etiquette at best, and harassment at worst, to deliberately send unwanted mail messages to strangers. Recipients who find such junk mail objectionable should contact the sender of the mail, and request to be removed from the mailing list. If the junk mail continues, the recipient should contact the appropriate CTSA.

10. Unrelated Use

A. CTRs are provided by the University for the sole purpose of supporting its mission. Without permission from the appropriate CTR, it is unethical to use Campus Technology Resources for: 1)commercial gain or placing a third party in a position of commercial advantage; or, 2) any non-university related activity, including non-university related communications.

This applies to each segment of the Electronic System utilized by such activity, and specifically to the Campus-Wide Data and Voice Network. Permission from the Vice Provost for Technology and Long-Range Planning must be obtained before using any portion of the Campus-Wide Data or Voice Network for these activities.

This paragraph is not intended to restrict free speech or to restrict casual, personal communications between consenting parties.

B. General University policy prohibits non-University use of University facilities. This does not prohibit the University, through its CTRs, from setting up Information servers or other CTR specifically designated for the purpose of fostering an "electronic community". These designated Information servers may or may not conform to the guidelines in the previous paragraph.

These designated Information servers or other CTRs are not exempt from any other portion of the University Information Technology Use Policy, the Guidelines of the Ethical Use of Information Technology or other general University policies.

11. Compliance with CTR Rules

A. When using Campus Technology Resources to access External Campus Technology Resources, you are ethically bound to comply with the rules, regulations, and appropriate use-statements of the External Campus Technology Resources. This includes but is not limited to complying with the usage rules of networks such as CREN (BITNET), USENET, EARN and NFSNet (the Internet), and The World-Wide Web (WWW).

B. You should carefully consider anything you send outside the University, because it could reflect on the whole University. In particular, anything you send to destinations outside the US, must satisfy the Department of Commerce rules (Section 779 of the Export Administration Regulations) for international transmission of information. If you send Information that does not satisfy the requirements of General License GTDA (General Technical Data Availability, Section 779.3), you must obtain the proper Individual Validated License or other available General License for the export of such material. Note in particular, that these rules severly restrict distribution outside the United States of cryptographic programs and software that implements the Data Encryption Standard (DES).

12. Additional Guidelines at Local Sites

The University Campus Technology Resources are composed of several "sites." Each site may have local rules and regulations which govern the use of Campus Technology Resources at that site. Each site has operators, consultants, and/or supervisors who have been given the responsibility to supervise the use of that site. Each site has a CTSA with overall policy responsibility for the site. CTR users are expected to cooperate with these individuals and comply with University and local site policies. Site policies may be more restrictive than University policy. In the event that there is a conflict between site policy and University policy, the more restrictive policy shall prevail. It is the responsibility of the CTR to post or distribute local rules and regulations in an appropriate manner.

13. Connection to the Campus-Wide Data Network

Many campus buildings are already included in the Campus-Wide Data Network topology. To maintain Campus Technology Resources integrity, Campus-Wide Data Network connections are made only by specialized personnel under the direction of the Information Technology Division. You are encouraged to attach appropriate equipment only at existing user- connection points. All requests for additional Campus-Wide Data Network connections or for the relocation of a connection should be directed to the Vice Provost for Technology and Long-Range Planning.

14. Shared Responsibility

All students, faculty and staff share responsibility for seeing that Electronic Information Technology Systems are used in an ethical manner. Please notify the appropriate CTR of any suspected violation the University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College (URGRGCC) Information Technology Use Policy. You may be asked to cooperate with the University should an investigation into the abuse of a Campus Technology Resource arise. You are also encouraged to report any information relating to a flaw in, or bypass of, Campus Technology Resources security to the appropriate CTR.

15. Copying of Software

The University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College (URGRGCC) licenses the use of its computer software from a variety of outside companies. University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College (URGRGCC) does not own this software or its related documentation and, unless authorized by the software developer, neither the University nor its employees and students have the right to reproduce it.

With regard to use on local area networks or on multiple machines, University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College (URGRGCC) employees and students shall use the software only in accordance with the license agreement, University Copyright Policy, and U.S. Copyright Law.

A. Reporting of Violations

University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College (URGRGCC) employees and students learning of any misuse of software or related documentation within the University shall notify their supervisor or, in the case of students, the appropriate faculty member, DTC, the University Copyright Officer, or other appropriate University official.

B. Disciplinary Action

University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College (URGRGCC) employees and students who make, acquire or use unauthorized copies of computer software will be disciplined as appropriate under the circumstances.

C. Civil and Criminal Liability

According to U.S. Copyright Law, a person who makes an unauthorized copy is liable to the copyright owner for actual damages and profits or statutory damages of up to $50,000.00 plus court costs and attorney fees. In addition, in certain cases the infringer may be criminally prosecuted and subject to a fine of up to $25,000 and imprisonment of up to one year.

Information Technology Use Policy

University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College (URGRGCC) has established a University Policy on Information Technology Use. That policy establishes the expectation that Campus Technology Resources will be used in an ethical manner. However, Campus Technology Resources are complex, evolving and incur some risk. This statement is intended to establish the expectations for the use of the Information Technology environment at the University.

Violation of this policy may result in suspension of privileges to access the information technology involved, initiation of University disciplinary procedures or, in extreme cases, criminal prosecution under federal or state law.

Please refer any questions about this policy or its applicability to a particular situation to the Vice President Technology and Long Range Planning.

A summary of this policy appears in computing labs across campus.

1. Integrity and Privacy not Guaranteed

A. The University does not guarantee the security, the confidentiality or the integrity of a user's Information on Campus Technology Resources. Some portions of the CTR are more secure than others. Very high standards of security and integrity prevail in portions of the CTR associated with Administrative Systems. In smaller local work group settings, the standards may not be as high. It is the user's responsibility to assess the risk and to use all means appropriate to safeguard Information. You use CTR at your own risk. Should you feel appropriate safeguards are not in place, you are advised to not use that portion of the CTR and to discuss the situation with the appropriate CTSA. The University will not be responsible for the loss or disclosure of user Information on Campus Technology Resources.

B. The University, through its employees, will treat all of its Information on students and employees as confidential, disclosing that Information only when authorized by the student or employee in question, approved by the appropriate University Official, or required by local, state or federal law. Student and employee information is accessed by University staff, formally authorized, on a need-to-know basis, only for the business purposes of the University. Aggregate information may be released by an appropriate University Official, for example, to respond to a survey.

C. Viruses, Trojan horses, worms, password breakers and packet observer programs are known to exist or have been known to exist on campus. Although reasonable efforts will be made to eradicate dangerous and unethical software, be aware that these programs exist, and take appropriate precautions. In particular, never run a program sent to you unless you know what it does and trust the source. Some "gifts" have been known to erase the recipient's files, send obscene messages in the recipient's name, replicate themselves, and generally cause trouble for the Electronic System on which they were run.

D. Some CTRs have procedures associated with mis-directed mail that involve someone acting in a "Postmaster" capacity. The Postmaster, as indicated in the University Information Technology Use Policy, may read mail file headers to the extent necessary to resolve addressing problems for delivery or diagnostic purposes. Typically, someone designated by each CTR has permission to look at any file on that associated portion of the CTR for diagnostic purposes only.

2. Ownership of Information

A. Information created using or stored in University Campus Technology Resources is subject to the University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College (URGRGCC) Copyright Policy, which covers copyright issues pertaining to University faculty, staff and students, as well as commissioned works of non-employees.

B. CTR users, as a condition of CTR use, recognize that the University may do as it sees fit with its owned and copyrighted Information. CTR users, as a condition of CTR use, grant the University permission to copy or delete Information they have created or stored in CTR. Some CTRs have procedures associated with the management of computer storage space that could result in Information being arbitrarily removed from a CTR. An example would be a policy of automatically deleting unread electronic or voice mail after a set period. Computer files which are unused for extended periods of time might be moved to off-line storage and eventually erased. Contact the appropriate CTSA for current storage management procedures, if any.

C. CTR users, as a condition of use, recognize that when they leave the University (cease to be an enrolled student or an employee of the University,) their Information may be removed from University CTRs without notice. CTR users must remove their Information or make arrangements for its retention prior to leaving the University. Specific CTR policies on retention and removal may vary by system.

3. Campus Technology Resources Administration of Information Servers

The University Information Technology Use Policy states, in part, "...it is unethical to store and or give access to Information on Campus Technology Resources that could result in legal action against the university". This requires that the CTSA for an Information server be responsible for the content of the server.

Users should be aware that CTR's will have appropriate policy and procedures set up for their Information servers as necessary to meet the requirements of University Information Technology Use Policy. When using a CTR Information server for the first time, you should find out if you have any responsibilities or restrictions beyond what has been indicated in the University Information Technology Use Policy and its Guidelines on the Ethical Use of Information Technology. This information is typically available from the CTR Information server or its CTSA.

4. Integrity and Safeguarding Activity in Shared Systems

A. Unrestricted CTR access ("Super-user Privilege") is granted only to immediate staff by the appropriate CTSA. These authorized individuals are responsible for the integrity and safeguarding of the Campus Technology Resources and the Information within them. They are expected to respect the privacy of Information within the CTR and are not exempt from the University Information Technology Use Policy.

B. To protect the integrity of the Campus Technology Resources against unauthorized or improper use, and to protect authorized users from the effects of unauthorized or improper usage, the University reserves the right to limit permanently or restrict any user's CTR usage; to inspect, copy, remove, or otherwise alter any Information or system resources that may undermine the authorized use of that Electronic System; and to do so with or without notice to the user. However, no such action will be taken without specific authorization from the appropriate CTSA. The University, through authorized individuals, also reserves the right to periodically check and monitor its Campus Technology Resources, and reserves any other rights necessary to protect the Campus Technology Resources.

C. The University disclaims responsibility and will not be responsible for loss or disclosure of user Information or interference with user Information resulting from its efforts to maintain the privacy, security, and integrity of its Campus Technology Resources and Information. Most CTRs have backup procedures that periodically save user Information. Backup copies may be stored off-site and may be retained for long periods of time. The intent is to be able to recover the Information in case of system disaster. CTR backup procedures and backup retention periods differ by individual CTR policy. You may or may not be able to recover lost information. The University retains the right to review Information contained in backups in conjunction with its CTR integrity and safeguarding activities or as part of an official investigation of alleged violation of University Policy.

D. The University reserves the right to take emergency action to safeguard the integrity and security of Campus Technology Resources. This includes but is not limited to the termination of a program, job, or on-line session, or the temporary alteration of user Access Codes. Such emergency action will be taken on the authorization of the appropriate CTSA. The taking of emergency action does not waive the rights of the University to take additional actions under this policy.

5. User Responsibility

A. To protect all users of Campus Technology Resources, you should contact the appropriate CTSA if you believe your rights have been compromised when using Campus Technology Resources. In such instances, please provide details including a description of the incident, date, time, and persons involved. If you suspect that your files have been altered or access has been gained to your Information, STOP. Do not alter, access or execute anything. Notify your instructor, DTC and/or CTSA immediately.

B. If you use a "personal" system, even if it is provided by the University, it is your responsibility to insure that the system is properly backed up and that the Information contained in that "personal" system is safeguarded. Contact your local CTSA for assistance if necessary.

C. In order to receive user support either from the University or vendors, you may be asked to produce the manuals, original diskettes, serial number, or other proof of proper software licensing. In addition, vendors may require proof of purchase to upgrade to a new version of the product. It is the responsibility of the appropriate CTSA, or the individual user in the case of a "personal" system, to insure that proper documentation and records are maintained.

6. Exposure to Offensive Material

Users should be aware that the University has no control over the content of Information servers on External Campus Technology Resources, for example, the World Wide Web. This is to inform you that some Information may be offensive to you and/or unsuitable for certain audiences. User discretion is advised.

7. Disclaimer of Liability

The University will not be liable for any losses, including lost revenues, or for any claims or demands against the user of an CTR by any other party. In no event will the University be liable for consequential damages, even if the University has been advised of the possibility of such damages. The University will not be responsible for any damages due to the loss of output, loss of data, time delay, Campus Technology Resources performance, software performance, incorrect advice from a consultant, or any other damages arising from the use of the University's Campus Technology Resources and Information. The University will make reasonable attempts to correct conditions and restore Information losses.

8. Information Technology Use Policy Procedures

A. Users of Information Technology at the University are expected to comply with the University of Rio Grande and Rio Grande Community College (URGRGCC) Information Technology Use Policy. In the event of a suspected violation, the appropriate instructor or CTSA will (in conjunction with University Counsel and University Security personnel, if necessary) investigate the allegations and determine if an offense has occurred.

B. The University will deal with violations of these policies in the same manner as violations of other university policies and may conduct a disciplinary review. In such a review, the accused may be subject to the full range of disciplinary sanctions, which include the loss of computer use privileges, dismissal from the University, and civil or criminal legal action.

Some violations of these policies may constitute a criminal offense. Individuals using campus computer facilities should be familiar with 18 USC 2701-2711 and ORC 2913.04.

APPENDIX A

The following is a partial list of Federal and State statutes critical to the development of the above policies:

Ohio Revised Code

2913.04 Unauthorized Use, Hacking, Cracking, etc.

(http://38.223.23.20/stacks/orc/title-29/sec-2913/home.htm )

4165.02 Forged origination information

(http://38.223.23.20/stacks/orc/title-41/sec-4165/home.htm)

United States Code (Revised) Statutes

18 U. S. C. 646 Embezzlement by a bank employee

18 U. S. C. 793 Gathering, transmitting, or losing defense information

18 U. S. C. 912 Impersonation of a government employee to obtain a thing of value

18 U. S. C. 1005 False entries in bank records

18 U. S. C. 1006 False entries in institution records

18 U. S. C. 1014 False statements in loan and credit applications

18 U. S. C. 1029 Credit card Fraud Act of 1984

18 U. S. C. 1030 Computer Fraud and Abuse Act

18 U. S. C. 1343 Wire fraud (use of a phone, wire, radio, or television transmissions to further a scheme to defraud

18 U. S. C. 1361 Malicious mischief to government property

18 U. S. C. 2071 Concealment, removal, or mutilation of public records

18 U. S. C. 2314 Interstate transportation of stolen property

18 U. S. C. 2319 Willful infringement of a copyright for profit

18 U. S. C. 2701-2711 Electronic Communications Privacy Act

 

Other Resources
Anti-Piracy Hotline: 1-800-688-2721
United States Code statutes...Search
http://law.house.gov/usearch.htm